Home History of Cycling Paris-Roubaix: By the numbers

Paris-Roubaix: By the numbers

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Franco Ballerini riding to his second victory in The Hell of the North

This year, Paris-Roubaix will be, for the first time, broadcast from start to finish and you can watch it online this Sunday, here.

Cycling’s most spectacular and brutal one-day race clicks into gear Sunday. Here is Paris-Roubaix, by the numbers:

  • The first edition took place in 1896 and was won by Germany’s Josef Fischer
  • Tom Boonen and Roger De Vlaeminck share the record for the most wins, 4
  • Smallest winning margin, 1 centimeter, or about 0.39 inch, when Eddy Planckaert beat Steve Bauer in 1990. Finish-line officials had to study the photo for more than 10 minutes before declaring the winner.
  • Roger De Vlaeminck is the rider with the most podium finishes, 9
  • 5:21 — Largest winning margin, in minutes, when Eddy Merckx beat De Vlaeminck in 1970
  • Slowest Roubaix, 12 hours and 15 minutes, when Henri Pélissier won in 1919 on roads destroyed by World War I.
  • Belgium leads the nation standings, with 55 triumphs in 112 editions
  • Frédéric Guesdon holds the record for the most starts, 17
  • Raymond Impanis and Servais Knaven have the most races completed, 16 each
  • 222km — Longest winning breakaway. Dirk Demol won in 1988.
  • 45.129kph — Fastest average speed, in 1964: Peter Post, on a slightly different course.
  • 22,857kph – Lowest average speed, in 1922
  • Marc Madiot is the only cyclist who has won Paris-Roubaix in the U23 ranks and subsequently as a pro
  • Stuart O’Grady and Mathew Hayman are the only cyclists from outside of Europe who nabbed the win in Paris-Roubaix
  • Oldest winner is Gilbert Duclos-Lassale in 1993, 38 years old
  • Youngest winner is Albert Champion in 1899, 20 years old
  • First time when the champion received a cobblestone-shaped trophy was in 1977
  • Five riders have won Paris-Roubaix after taking the victory in the Tour de France: Louison Bobet, Fausto Coppi, Felice Gimondi, Bernard Hinault and Eddy Merckx
  • In 1949, the victory was awarded to two riders: Serse Coppi and André Mahé